What is Dynamic DNS? How does it work and how to setup DDNS?

What is a Dynamic DNS?

Dynamic DNS is a service that automatically and periodically updates your DNS’s A (IPv4) or AAAA (IPv6) records when your IP address changes. These IP changes are made by your Internet provider.

Dynamic DNS

 

How does Dynamic DNS work?

The Dynamic DNS monitors the IP address for changes. When the address changes (which it will if you have a dynamic IP address), the DDNS (or DynDNS) service updates your new IP address.

Why is it useful?

It can be very useful for people who want to host their website, access CCTV cameras, VPN, app or game server from their home computer. It is cheaper than to have a static public IP and by setting up Dynamic DNS, you will avoid the need to update all of your records whenever your IP changes manually. Also, static IP address is not always an option; it depends on your Internet provider.

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Monitoring your DNS, should you do it?

DNS provides, have excellent security measures to protect your DNS and deliver outstanding performance. The paid plans include DNS Failover & Monitoring, DNSSEC, many nameservers, and even more Anycast DNS locations. With so many safety measures should you be monitoring your DNS or should you just leave it without supervision?monitoring

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10 most used Nslookup commands

What is Nslookup?

First lets clarify what is Nslookup – it is a powerful network administration command-line tool, available for many of the popular computer operating systems for querying Domain Name System (DNS) to obtain domain names or IP addresses, mapping or for any other specific DNS Records.

Need more details what is nslookup? Check the nslookup page on wikipedia.

DNS, records, nslookup

Here are the 10 most used command lines with nslookup that will help you to understand better your domain’s management:

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DNS zone file and zone transfer

We have already covered the bases of DNS, so you know what it is and how does it work. This article will help you understand one of the concept inside the DNS – zone transfer. In order to explain it, let’s first see what a zone file is.

zone transfer

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DNS Failover, the backup that keeps your site online

It is Monday, you just entered the office, and it is a total mess. Apparently, during the weekend your website was down. There are plenty of angry e-mails from customers, and your IT specialists are running crazy to fix the problem. You lost sales and potential new clients, and all of this just because you didn’t have a DNS Failover. DNS Failover can keep your website online even if some of the PoPs are down and it is not hard to set up. Would you like to know more about it?

DNS Failover

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Australia DNS, use DNS to provide better service

Australia is the 13th largest economy in the world, according to the International Monetary Fund. So you can expect a highly developed country in every sense, right? Not really! If you have business there, for sure, you have the pain to use the slow internet there. Its speed is 55th in the world (State of the Internet report)! And to make the matter worse, the Australian government is not pushing the local ISPs strongly. So what could the local businesses do to provide a good service – Australia DNS!

Australia DNS

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Can we use free DNS? Free DNS vs. Premium

If you are searching already free DNS, you know what DNS is and for what it serves. The DNS will resolve your domain name. If you have more DNS servers and they are spread around the world, this process will be faster, and it will reduce the load. It will even add an extra level of protection, imagine if one of the servers is down, the users can still find your domain using the rest of the DNS servers.

Free DNS

Free DNS

Different companies offer such a Free DNS plan like us from ClouDNS.net. With this plan, you can manage your DNS. It has many of the features of a professional DNS plan. You can use up to 4 DNS servers and 3 DNS zones. You will have three mail forwards. This plan is popular among people who need Dynamic DNS for their connected devices like CCTV cameras and other security measurements. It is used for personal blogs or parked domains.

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Internet and DNS in Asia (Singapore, Hong Kong, Malaysia and more)

Current Internet state in Asia

Let’s first talk about the internet in Asia Pacific region. According to the Statista, this region is the most important internet area in the world. There are more than a billion users, with the 3 most connected countries – China (731m), India(462m) and Indonesia (132.7m).

Despite the enormous numbers, there is still plenty of room for growth. The internet penetration there is 44.7%, so still more than the half of the people there don’t use the internet. There are many users, and more are yet to connect. This makes it an exciting market. With a lot of traffic, the need of DNS in Asia will just grow as well. So to provide an excellent service in Hong Kong or Japan you will need DNS.

DNS

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What is DNS propagation? How to check DNS propagation?

DNS propagation, you already know what DNS is, and if you don’t, you can check it HERE.
Now let’s see the second word – propagation. To propagate, it means to spread ideas, opinions among people and places (Cambridge Dictionary).

DNS propagation

DNS propagation

It is about the time it takes, to expire the cache in the recursive servers after you make your nameservers to point to new hosting. When you make the changes in your DNS records, they will get instantly updated in the authoritative servers. It will take extra time, for the data, to be modified in all the recursive servers along the way.

The connection passes through many recursive servers, including those in your internet provider (ISP). All of them have TTL (Time to live) which defines for how long they will keep the DNS cache with the DNS records. The DNS cache exists mostly for load balancing so that it won’t be so heavy on your nameservers and to make the whole process faster.

When a user uses their browser to open a web page for the first time, he or she will send a request all the way to an authoritative server. If it is not for the first time, the request will get an answer on the way in a recursive server, and if the data is still up to date, the user will get his answer quicker.

Basically, the DNS propagation depends on the TTL in the DNS records.

How to make the DNS propagation faster?

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